Super Tuesday by the Numbers | Beaufort County Now

Like sports, it all comes down to the numbers. lifezette, super tuesday, presidential race, democrats, march 4, 2020
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Super Tuesday by the Numbers

Publisher's note: This post appears here courtesy of the LifeZette, and written by David Kamioner.

    The first round of the Democratic primary playoffs are over. Actually, more like the first phase of a war. The news from those trenches will gladden GOP hearts, the Democrat war will not only continue but get more vicious.

    The numbers tell that story.

    As we stand Wednesday morning Biden leads the delegate count with 660. Sanders trails closely at 586. Bloomberg has 110 and 101 for Warren. Bloomberg withdrew from the race Wednesday morning.

    That means if Warren got out and threw her support to Sanders, then Sanders could vault to the lead. Tuesday's numbers reflect a poor showing by Bloomberg and Warren, she even lost her home state of Massachusetts. It was a good night for Sanders and a very good night for Biden. Biden will gain greatly from Bloomberg leaving the race. Bloomberg has said he will endorse Biden.

    Though the press is desperately calling the night for Biden because they know Sanders would be crushed by Trump, Sanders is far from out of it. His victory in delegate rich California made it a solid night for him.

    Biden winning Texas and many other states was impressive, but not enough to knock Sanders out. Far from it. The Sanders people are energized going into Florida and future contests. Though Sanders will have a very hard time in Florida.

    Last night Biden took Virginia with 99 delegates, North Carolina with 110, Alabama with 53, Tennessee with 64, Texas with 228, Arkansas with 31, Oklahoma with 37, Massachusetts with 91, and Minnesota with 75. Remember, candidates only get the number of delegates proportionate to their share/percentage of the vote.

    Sanders took California worth 415, Vermont at 16, Utah with 29, and Colorado worth 67 delegates.

    Bloomberg took American Samoa worth 6 delegates. Much too little for much too much a cost.

    It will take 1,991 delegates to win on the first ballot at the Democratic National Convention in July in Milwaukee. There are very big contests ahead like New York and Florida and the race is so close between Biden and Sanders at the end of the day leading into July it may not be clear who will be on top.

    But one thing is very clear: From this point on, Warren is only a spoiler. She has no chance at a first ballot convention victory.

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