2019 Reading Selection Highlights Impact of Nature in Society | Beaufort County Now

“The Nature Principle” by Richard Louv has been selected as the 2019 Pirate Read at East Carolina University. the nature principle, richard louv, pirate read, east carolina university, ECU, july 18, 2019
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2019 Reading Selection Highlights Impact of Nature in Society

    Publisher's note: The author of this post, Grady Dillon, is a contributor to ECU News Services.

The Nature Principle” by Richard Louv has been selected as the 2019 Pirate Read at East Carolina University. | Photo: Rhett Butler

    "The Nature Principle" by Richard Louv has been selected as the 2019 Pirate Read at East Carolina University.

    All incoming students are asked to read the book before the beginning of their first semester.

    "The Nature Principle" is about the restorative powers of the natural world and how society can benefit from the power of nature. Louv states that society has developed such an outsized faith in technology that it is hard to realize how human capacities can be enhanced through nature. His theory is supported in the book by groundbreaking research and compelling personal stories.

    In the book, Louv demonstrates how tapping into the powers of the natural world can help boost creativity, promote health and build smarter businesses and communities. Louv says that by reconnecting with nature, the human race can and will thrive.

    Louv is a journalist, commentator and the author of nine books that have been translated and published in 24 countries. He is co-founder and chairman emeritus of the Children & Nature Network aimed at connecting children, families and communities to nature. In 2008, he was awarded the national Audubon Medal. Louv has served as a visiting scholar for Clemson University and Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy and Management.

    Mary Beth Corbin, executive director of student transitions, said "The Nature Principle" was chosen because of its multiple themes.

    Corbin said that a few examples of the themes are: tapping the power of the natural world for our physical, emotional and family fitness, knowing who you are by knowing where you are, and high-tech design where we live, work and play.

    "Students are so wrapped up in the world of technology which is how our world is today. Reading this book will encourage students to step away from technology and reconnect with the natural world around them," Corbin said.

    Corbin said the Pirate Read Committee plans to put signs across campus with information about the book during the fall semester, as well as facts about ECU's sustainability actions.

    Louv will speak at ECU on Nov. 5 at 7 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

    A committee of faculty, staff and students selects the annual Pirate Read and coordinates activities with departments within academic and student affairs.

    The purposes of the summer read program are to orient students to the academic community by encouraging intellectual dialogue and critical thinking, and to prepare students for the college-level environment. The program also allows students to share a common reading experience with fellow classmates and faculty, and enables students and faculty to discuss ideas from the book across the curriculum.

    Past Pirate Read selections include "The Last Ballad," "Evicted" and "Just Mercy." This is the 12th year of the Pirate Read program.

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